This week: a Dutchman flaunting his favourite colour.

Philips_SQ-C60_wrapped

The price is right

I’m assuming this was the price in Dutch guilders in the mid 70’s for a three-pack, as I remember paying less than 5 guilders for entry level chrome tapes in the early 90’s.

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Wrapped in plastic

The eagerness to record, and the irritation of having to get the foil off.
And then having to do this another 9 times, as I always bought a box of ten cassettes.
But this is a rather loose fitting foil from the 70’s, so it’s easily removed and discarded, as for some reason it’s not sticking to your hands – no static. Off with it!

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That 70’s colour

Yes, it’s very orange. Great!

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Loose ends

Although this is a brand new tape, it comes out of the foil slightly unwound.
Still, nothing a well applied pencil won’t fix.

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Hidden messages?

On the A-side, there’s a hidden and rotated C, and on the B-side there’s a hidden D. But why?

Philips_SQ-C60_c

Philips_SQ-C60_d

See-through

As you can see, the cassette housing is transparent.

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However, you can come across an older version (I’m assuming), with solid black plastic but without an A or B side indication on the label.

Where are you from?

“I’m from Holland. No, I’m not. Yes, I am”.

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Cornering

It’s a joint effort.

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Less advertising

In the early days of cassettes manufacturers used the outside of the inlay card as advertisement space, to make the tape look good. Later, this was done using the foil. From then on it was common practice that the user could write on both sides. Here, we probably see the first take on this, sacrificing half of the inlay card to writing space.

Philips_SQ-C60_outlay

Over and out

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